Arthur Temple College of Forestry and Agriculture

SpatialVideoUnmanned aerial systems, often referred to as drones, are fast becoming a fundamental implement in the modern forester’s toolkit. With these instruments, foresters can measure tree height, conduct tree health assessments and gain an unparalleled view of forest canopy composition. Dr. Daniel Unger, professor of remote sensing and geographic information systems, piloted one of the college’s UASs to capture footage of forestry field station students surveying boundaries and conducting a forest inventory assessment at the Stephen F. Austin Experimental Forest.

 

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ConclaveThe Sylvans, Stephen F. Austin State University's timbersports team, hosted the Association of Southern Forestry Clubs 60th annual Forestry Conclave. This year’s competition brought together 13 universities from across the Southeastern United States to compete in two days of technical and physical events. From wildlife identification and photogrammetry to crosscut saw and pole climb, students showcased their intellectual and physical strength in the Piney Woods of East Texas.

In the end, the SFA Sylvans reclaimed the championship title, followed by Clemson University in 2nd place and University of Arkansas at Monticello in 3rd.

 

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PplPremiumSince 2014, students enrolled in the Department of Agriculture's advanced beef science course have planned and executed the first cattle sales in SFA history. From marketing and obtaining cattle, to sale execution, students are involved in every aspect of the sale. See a small fraction of all of the behind-the-scenes action in this video.

 

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rootcamp2016Each semester, freshman forestry students receive a crash course in their chosen field of study. Root Camp, a component of the college's introductory forestry course, provides an opportunity for new students to gain a better understanding of the field, while also having fun and forging new friendships. See what Root Camp is all about, and recieve a tour of the trails of the Pineywoods Native Plant Center courtesy of Dr. I-Kuai Hung.

 

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yell2016Each summer, a number of Arthur Temple College of Forestry and Agriculture students spend two weeks in Yellowstone and Grand Teton National Parks collecting data on behalf of park management. From backcountry surveys to meeting with park leadership, our students experience some of the best these national parks have to offer. Learn more about this year's experience from a selection of student interviews conducted on the shore of Wyoming's Jackson Lake.

 

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CRSix Stephen F. Austin State University students recently spent two weeks in Costa Rica as a part of the SFA study abroad course Leadership Development and Community Engagement, led by Dr. Daniel Scognamillo, SFA associate professor of wildlife ecology, and Dr. Gary Kronrad, Bone Hill Foundation Distinguished Professor of resource economics at SFA's Arthur Temple College of Forestry and Agriculture. The course focused on exploring multifaceted solutions to the challenge of balancing economic development with natural resource conservation. Hear their perspectives and catch a glimpse of the beauty and inspiration the country of Costa Rica has to offer. 

 

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yellFor more than five years, SFA forestry students have collected data and conducted research at Grand Teton and Yellowstone National Parks. During the summer of 2016, 13 more students will continue this tradition, performing backcountry visitor experience surveys, analyzing the effectiveness of National Park Service media and capturing visitor experience data. These are the perspectives of three students who participated during the summer 2015 season.

 

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outreachdayOn April 9, 2016, ATCOFA hosted a Forestry Outreach Day to engage the SFA and East Texas communities in natural resource management and conservation. ATCOFA students, as well as several city and state agencies, provided educational information and activities that covered a diverse array of subject matter. Additionally, Kai Busch-Peterson, forestry student and certified drone pilot, illustrated the growing use of drones in natural resource managment, capturing aerial footage of the event.

 

Watch the event highlight video here.

 

marife2Environmental science graduate student Marife Anunciado discuses her research and results regarding the effectiveness of selected plant species in removing atmospheric ammonia. Her research, funded by the Natural Resources Conservation Service, will ultimately provide options for improving air quality through the use of shelter belts around large-scale livestock operations.

 

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DSC 3435reducedThe SFA chapter of the Student Association for Fire Ecology assisted SFA's Department of Agriculture conduct a controlled burn at the Walter C. Todd Agricultural Research Center on February 5, 2016. The low-intensity controlled burn was used as an agricultural management tool to remove accumulated vegetative material and foster the growth of new livestock forage. Learn more about using fire as a management tool here

 

Watch footage of the controlled burn here.

 

 

Big brown and evening batsATCOFA students participated in the 2015 Bat Blitz sponsored by the Southeastern Bat Diversity Network. In addition to collecting valuable data for a nationwide data set, the event promotes bat conservation, education and provides opportunities for public involvement. This short video illustrates a catch and release filmed during one of the surveys conducted in East Texas. To learn more about the Southeastern Bat Diversity Network and their efforts to conserve this valuable resource, visit their website.

 

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rootcampCareers and Competencies in Forestry, previously known as Introduction to Forestry, serves as the foundational course through which students pursuing a Bachelor of Science in Forestry begin their exploration of the discipline. It is also the class in which students meet peers they will spend the next four years working alongside in the field and in the classroom. To improve students’ technical and personal development, the course now involves a weekend of skill and camaraderie-building activities known as Root Camp.

“The primary goal is to help build a community within the student body, while also providing them with the skills they will need in future classes,” said Dr. Shelby Laird, assistant professor of forestry.

In 2013, the college completed a comprehensive, research-based curriculum assessment and revision to ensure the forestry program continues to effectively produce natural resource professionals capable of successfully meeting the demands of the evolving field. Laird said that Root Camp serves to strengthen key competencies emphasized by the research, such as interpersonal communication skills, the ability to work as a cohesive team and the development of leadership qualities.

During the camp, held the weekend of September 11, key technical skills, including how to navigate with a compass and take forest stand measurements, were incorporated into activities conducted around the SFA campus. Laird said this familiarized the class, primarily composed of freshmen and transfer students, with portions of campus they otherwise might not see within their first few weeks at SFA, such as the SFA Recreation Trails and Gardens and Pineywoods Native Plant Center.

 

Watch the 2015 Root Camp highlight video

 

 

Master of Science in Agriculture student Julie Williams explains her contribution to the growing body of research that seeks to address the prevalence of melanoma in grey horses.

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SFA ATCOFA TexturedLogoHave you ever thought, "Why forestry?" After seeing our students and faculty in action through this video, we think you will understand.

Boom De Yada! was coordinated by Angela Sutherland, president of the National Association of Interpretation (NAI), and NAI members. Boom De Yada! was filmed and produced by Trey Cartwright of SFA University Marketing Communications.
 

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DeerThis February, Dr. Christopher Comer's big game management course (FOR 411) assisted in deer capture and data collection in South Texas. Their work will contribute to a long-term study regarding deer antler growth on multiple ranches in the region.

 

 

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KylehandMaster of Science in Forestry student Kyle Hand describes the management history of the Eastern wild turkey in East Texas, as well as current efforts underway to ensure the successful recolonization of the native species.

 

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AmyUrbMaster of Science in Environmental Science student Amy Urbanovsky provides a first-hand look at her research project monitoring the development of wetlands surrounding Lake Naconiche, a 692-acre reservior located in Nacogdoches County.

 

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AhmadMaster of Science in Environmental Science student Ahmad Nasser shares an overview of his thesis research conducted at SFA's Walter C. Todd Agricultural Research Center. Through his project, Nasser quanitified worker exposure to ammonia at three separate facilities, providing insight into the potential need for control measures to protect worker health.

 

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Texas Leaf Cutter Ant Song

 During the Forest Insects and Diseases lab students perform the Texas Leaf Cutter Ant song with Dr. David Kulhavy.

 
 

Field Station Field Station is a six-week summer program located at the Pineywoods Conservation Center Camp. During the six weeks, students will attend various forestry-oriented courses per week. Such courses included forestry fieldwork, mill tours, wildlife research, GIS technology and much more. These courses are required for juniors and seniors at the Arthur Temple College of Forestry and Agriculture.

For more information please contact Dr. Hans Williams, Associate Dean at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

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larissaLarissa Philpot is a 2006 graduate from the SFASU Arthur Temple College of Forestry and Agriculture, where she received both her bachelors and masters degrees in environmental science. She now works as the City Planner for the City of Nacogdoches. She credits small class sizes, personalized degree plans, and hands-on labs to her success. A large portion of her career involves the use of skills she learned in classes such as geographic information systems, soils, ecology, reclamation, environmental law, and dendrology.

 

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WetlandDr. Hans Williams introduces a course on wetland delineation.  This video describes the combined lecture and field laboratory that the students get to experience. While the lecture concentrate on theory, the laboratories provide student with an opportunity to get real world, hands on experience.  Our students are able to practice their plant, soils, and hydrology assessment skills using a technique required for use by the regulated community.  Students are also exposed to modern location and data collection techniques like GPS and GIS, as well as wetland functional assessment techniques.

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environmental hydrologyDr. Matthew McBroom narrates his course on environmental hydrology. This class explores environmental interactions with water resources, especially how land use effects water quality and quantity.  The video describes how students are given a chance to learn while performing a valuable service to the community.  Students return to the lab to process water samples collected, thus integrating field and laboratory methodologies.

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